(Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images)

Katy Perry's "Iconic" Looking Glass Gala Dress Is Highly Unoriginal - Moschino Sued

In an unfortunate series of events, Moschino and Jeremy Scott are under fire for plagiarizing... graffiti. 

Does this look familiar at all to you? It should... because this is the image on Katy Perry's China: Through The Looking Glass dress.

According to E!, Jeremy Scott is being sued by Joseph Tierney, Street Name "Rime," based on the "iconic" and "memorable" dress.

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 04:  Katy Perry attends the "China: Through The Looking Glass" Costume Institute Benefit Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 4, 2015 in New York City.  (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 04: Katy Perry attends the "China: Through The Looking Glass" Costume Institute Benefit Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 4, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)

Not only did the dress don the design, but Scott's Suit also had the eyes on the back. Clearly Rime was not consulted before the design was created, and he is now saying just that.

E! quotes the lawsuit: "Defendants paid Ms. Perry to advertise and display the clothing at the Gala. Not only did Ms. Perry and defendant Scott advertise, wear, and display the clothing at the event, they arrived at the event in a spray painted  Rolls Royce, and even carried around Moschino branded cans of fake spray paint during the event, as if defendants were responsible for the artwork."

Perry is also not the only one to wear the dress, as Gigi Hadad modeled it for Milan's Fashion Week in February:

A model walks the runway at the Moschino show during the Milan Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2015 on February 26, 2015 in Milan, Italy.
Gigi Hadid walks the runway at the Moschino show during the Milan Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2015 on February 26, 2015 in Milan, Italy. (Photo by Pietro D'Aprano/Getty Images)

Now, I'm no legal analyst, but let me give you a little schooling on Art Appropriation, and how potentially Moschino can get out of this. As an artist myself, I would be mega upset at someone taking my good hard work and putting it on their clothes and making millions of dollars, so by all means, personally, I'd side with Rime on this one from a "Kicking down the man" aspect. But for Jeremy Scott's case, he could throw Rime a little bone called "Art Appropriation."

RemixTheBook.com states "Appropriation art takes a (usually) recognizable object, text or image and recontextualizes it. In the new context, the associations that the reader/viewer has with the appropriated object are subverted, and he or she is forced to reexamine his/her relationship to it. Therefore appropriated art is often political, satirical and/or ironic."

A fair example of this would be Shepard Fairey's "Hope" poster from the 2008 Campaign of President Barack Obama vs. The Associated Press against a photo he used to create the image. (To read more, visit ObeyGiant, Fairey's Website)

A more controversial pick is Sherrie Levine's After Walker Evans (1981) V. Walker Evans' Alabama Tenant Farmer's Wife (1936), in which Sherrie Levine shot a photo of Walker Evans' photo in a gallery, and reproduced her shot, and it was still considered a Contemporary and Post-Modern art legacy. (To read more, see StudentPulse.com)

So the question is, if Jeremy Scott has seen this particular image prior from Rime and chose to use it as a design for his clothing, could he potentially get away with using "Art Appropriation" as an excuse? I mean, Andy Warhol's Campbell Series is all based on image appropriation of the soup labels, so would a dress be the same? Since appropriation in the legal context is based on visual images, it very well could be. Which in that case, Rime, you might be out of luck.

Amy Cooper is a writer and pop culture fact nerd, and on multiple occasions has been referred to as a “Walking iPod.”